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Flood Situation- Latest update


NUMBERS AT A GLANCE

SOURCE

Total Affected Population

20.3 million

NDMA – October 13

Estimated Deaths

1,974

NDMA– October 13

Houses Damaged or Destroyed

1.7 million

IOM2 – October 21

Latest situation

Ø As floodwaters recede throughout Pakistan, populations continue to return home. According to the Government of Pakistan (GoP) National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), an estimated 98 percent of people displaced from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPk) Province and 90 percent of people displaced from Punjab Province had returned home as of October 20.

Ø The NDMA estimates that approximately 54 percent of the displaced population in Sindh Province has returned home. However, standing floodwater continues to prevent returns in some areas, particularly in western Sindh.

Ø Road access to upper Swat District, KPK Province, continues to improve. As a result, the U.N. World Food Program (WFP) began transporting emergency relief commodities to the area by road on October 18.

Ø On October 20, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) began distributing wheat seed, vegetable seed, and fertilizer to 3,077 households in KPk Province as part of a USAID-funded agriculture program designed to help flood-affected farming families recover for the winter planting season. USAID’s program will benefit more than 171,000 households in KPk Province, or approximately 28 percent of the households most in need of seeds and fertilizer in flood-affected areas throughout the country. USAID has also funded FAO for a similar seed distribution program in Punjab Province for more than 207,000 vulnerable farming households.

Ø This week, USAID/OFDA committed an additional $5.3 million in humanitarian assistance for the floods, bringing total U.S. assistance to date to nearly $404 million. The U.S. has also provided other civilian and military in-kind assistance, valued at approximately $79 million1, in the form of halal meals, pre-fabricated steel bridges, other infrastructure support, and air support to and within Pakistan to transport goods and rescue people.

Ø The most recent USAID/OFDA assistance was provided to a Pakistan-based organization to address the emergency and early recovery needs of more than 300,000 people in Sindh, Gilgit-Baltistan, and KPk provinces. The grantee will distribute water containers and seeds, construct latrines, repair infrastructure, and provide health care, temporary employment, and materials to winterize shelter and repair damaged homes.

Ø According to the NDMA, this year’s monsoon season officially ended on October 15, and next year’s monsoon season will officially begin on June 15. In preparation for heavy rainfall and potential flooding in 2011, the GoP hopes to repair and strengthen key flood barriers throughout the country.

Source:

http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/RWFiles2010.nsf/FilesByRWDocUnidFilename/MUMA 8AH3L7-full_report.pdf/$File/full_report.pdf

Situation of Women and Children

The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women CEDAW notes with alarm that 85 percent of persons displaced by the flood are women and children.  Of that percentage, 500,000 women are pregnant.  Each day 1700 women go into labour and hundreds will experience complications requiring life-saving medical intervention.  Maternal mortality is high in Pakistan and the numbers will rise due to lack of medical facilities (over 200 hospitals and clinics in the affected areas have been destroyed), and the absence of female health care workers (many Pakistani women will not receive care from a male medical worker due to cultural and religious beliefs). In addition, a lack of proper nutrition and clean water in the IDP camps will have dire effects on women, especially those breast-feeding, and on their children.  As the floodwaters rise, they are at acute risk from starvation, exposure, disease, sexual assault, violence and trafficking. The Committee calls upon the Pakistani authorities and relief agencies to take concrete measures with respect to all of the Committee’s concerns, including measures to prevent sexual and physical abuse and trafficking of girls and women. The Committee also urges authorities and aid agencies to combat any constraints women and girls may face from accessing basic services or humanitarian aid, including cultural barriers.

The Committee on the Rights of the Child expresses concern about the very high infant and under-five mortality rates in Pakistan, with an estimated 500,000 under-five infant deaths each year due to preventable causes. It is deeply concerned that the floods are worsening infant and child mortality. The CRC is further concerned at the breakdown of communication and infrastructure in the north-western area of Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkwa province, an area of pre-existing conflict, where women and especially girls are known to have been denied access to basic health and education services. The CRC expresses deep concern at the heightened risk that girls be discriminated against, sexually abused and trafficked. The CRC urges authorities and all persons involved with relief and humanitarian assistance to heighten their efforts to reach the youngest children and those most difficult to reach. Girls and children with disabilities should be the utmost priority.

Source:

http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/docs/Pakistan_Floods%20_JointStatement.doc


NUMBERS AT A GLANCE

SOURCE

Total Affected Population

20.3 million

NDMA – October 13

Estimated Deaths

1,974

NDMA– October 13

Houses Damaged or Destroyed

1.7 million

IOM2 – October 21

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Vision 21 is Pakistan based non-profit, non- party Socio-Political organisation. We work through research and advocacy for developing and improving Human Capital, by focusing on Poverty and Misery Alleviation, Rights Awareness, Human Dignity, Women empowerment and Justice as a right and obligation. We act to promote and actively seek Human well-being and happiness by working side by side with the deprived and have-nots.

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